Our sponsors make possible Folkmoot!

Our sponsors make possible Folkmoot 2018!

Our sponsors make possible Folkmoot!

Without a doubt, Folkmoot could not exist – now for 35 years – without the support of our corporate sponsors.

And, yes, we are without question so very grateful for the thousands of private donations and volunteer efforts of the entire community.

But without our generous sponsors – who give not only treasure but also time and talent – there would be no Folkmoot and our region would be without its premier summer festival and North Carolina would be without its official international folk festival.

Folkmoot Festival 2018 ended July 29 but activities and programs continue year-round. Be sure to visit our  Videos & Images Page, here on our website for images of Folkmoot Festival 2018. Our Facebook page is a pretty handy way to keeping up with the latest events.

In addition to those appearing on our Video & Images page, we also have links to larger collections by some of the areas best photographers and videographers. Our Instagram is a pretty active place, too!

Once here in beautiful Haywood County, NC, we invite you to stay awhile and enjoy all our unique and historic region has to offer.

We are grateful for our sponsors and we list them on their own page here on our website and we scroll them continuously at the bottom of our front page. Click on their logos to visit their websites and learn more about their services and products. Visit them often, buy from them, engage them in business.

They sponsor Folkmoot because they are also deeply involved in the broader community of Haywood County and Western North Carolina and because they care about the amazing quality of life we enjoy in our region. They are also care deeply about the cultural exchange and understanding, peace-building to which Folkmoot is committed.

In no certain order (because all are equally important) our team of Sponsors include:

 

The Mountaineer
The Mountaineer
Smoky Mountain News
Smoky Mountain News
Folkmoot
Downtown Waynesville NC
Folkmoot
Blue Ridge Public Radio
Folkmoot
Asheville Citizen-Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
The Mountain Xpress

 

 

 

Folkmoot
WNCW 887 Public Radio

 

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
VisitNCSmokies.com
Folkmoot
Town of Waynesville, NC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
WLOS ABC-TV Asheville

 

 

Folkmoot
WNC Magazine

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
Cherokee Historical Preservation Foundation
Folkmoot
Haywood Regional Medical Center

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
Evergreen Packaging

 

Folkmoot
Community Foundation of Western North Carolina

 

Folkmoot
Harrah’s Cherokee Casino Resort

 

Folkmoot
Town of Franklin, NC

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
Mast General Store
Folkmoot
Beverly-Hanks & Associates

 

 

 

Folkmoot
Champion Janitorial Supply

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
United Community Bank
Folkmoot
Ingles Markets

 

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
HVO, Inc
Entegra Bank

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
City of Hickory, NC
Folkmoot
Hickory International Council

 

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
Pepsi Bottling Ventures
Folkmoot
Rotary of Asheville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
Town Mountain Preserve
Folkmoot
The Laurel of Asheville

 

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
The Classic Wineseller
Folkmoot
Silver Bluff Village

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
Haywood EMC
Folkmoot
The Village Framer

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
Frye Regional Medical Center
Folkmoot
National Endowment for the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
North Carolina Arts Council

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
Haywood County Arts Council

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
International Council of Organizations of Folklore Festivals and Folk Arts
Folkmoot
AmeriPride Linen & Uniform

 

 

Folkmoot
Commscope

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
Sheppard Insurance Group
Folkmoot
The Inn at Tranquility Farm

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot
Romantic Asheville Travel Guide
Folkmoot
Kanini’s Dining*Takeout*Catering

 

Folkmoot
Cherokee Bottled Water
Folkmoot
Vicinitus Haywood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Folkmoot

Folkmoot Guides map the festival trail

Folkmoot Guides map the festival trail

Folkmoot Guides map the festival trail and without this tough and resilient corps of young Western Carolina leaders the Folkmoot Festival would be stranded in the wilderness.

The Guides are high school and college students who dedicate a summer (often multiple summers) to Folkmoot and serve as counselors, tour leaders, information specialists, sometimes translators and overall top assistant and major domo for each of the international dance troupes visiting Western Carolina for the Folkmoot Festival.

Without this devoted and enthusiastic corps of young leaders the visiting groups might feel lost and overwhelmed by the non-stop adventure that is participating in Folkmoot and the festival itself could simply not survive without the Guides.

For their part, the Guides find the experience nothing short of life-changing. Many Folkmoot Guides have gone on to build careers based in whole or in part on the values they learned through the Folkmoot experience – values of peace-making, cultural understand and cultural exchange.

Folkmoot 2018 opens July 19 and runs through July 29 and will feature performing dance troupes from Ghana, Italy, Czech Republic, Mexico, Thailland and Northern Cyprus and Venezuela as well as Anglo Appalachian and, as always, Cherokee dancers and musicians. 

Ticket packages and tickets for individual performances are available here.

Once here for the festival we invited you to stay awhile and enjoy all our beautiful region has to offer.

The activities, duties and responsibilities of Folkmoot Guides begin well before the festival and last for weeks following the festival. This is no ordinary summer job. It’s more favorably compared, perhaps, to a long-term mission trip – one is which participants both change the world and are changed by it.

Folkmoot Guide Training begins this week

Although working throughout the summer getting ready for the 2018 Folkmoot Festival, the Guides’ training begins in earnest – and in an intense, immersive timetable – on Friday. Yes, Friday the 13th. Whatev.

During the training – and during the Festival – the Guides will live at Folkmoot Center, as will the visiting dance troupes when they begin arriving next week.

Training focuses on topics such as, “what leadership looks like,” “what to expect at Folkmoot,” Folkmoot sign language (yes, we have our own), emergency procedures, conflict resolution & peace-making, world & global politics & societies, Cherokee & First Nations 101, stage management, stage lighting, stage sound and many other topics.

Sound intense? Yes, it is. But along the way they will also have wonderfully fun times and adventures and form bonds with each other – and with the visiting dance troupes – which will last the rest of their lives.

Being a Folkmoot Guide is simply an experience of one’s lifetime. Ask any of them – past or present – and they will tell you.

Folkmoot Guides 2018

If you visit any Folkmoot 2018 performance or event, you will no doubt spot these outstanding young people popping in and out of crowds, dashing and darting about and, generally, making all the magic look like magic.

The 2018 Guide Corps includes:

Heather Davidson has been around Folkmoot since she was a child. Her mother was a volunteer, and Heather spend many summers at Folkmoot with her. She volunteered every year until she was old enough to be a guide. She has since been a guide for Trinidad, Puerto Rico, Uganda, France, and Russia! Her favorite part about Folkmoot is the time in between all the events, shows, and meetings. She loves this time because it’s when she gets to know everyone and become like a family during their time together.

 

 

Yetunde Bashorun is a returning guide with Folkmoot and 2018 will be her second festival.  She was the intern who helped to launch Cultural Conversations in 2017.  Yetunde loves working with Folkmoot because she cares about the organization’s mission to celebrate diversity and inclusion throughout western North Carolina communities. Yetunde loves to be outdoors and is an avid hiker. Yetunde was born in Lagos Nigeria.

 

 

 

Ethan Cronk has worked with Folkmoot during the annual Folkmoot festival for two years now and is coming up on his third year. The last two festivals he worked as an assistant guide and is ready to jump in as a full guide this summer! He loves working with Folkmoot because it offers a family-like community, and he gets to interact with people from all over the world. Ethan will be graduating from Tuscola High School this summer and plans to attend NC State for International Business.

 

 

Avery is returning as an Assistant Guide for the 2018 Festival and attends Tuscola High School.  He is a junior in high school with an array of talents. Avery plays the violin and baritone, works on computers, is a stilt walker, and has studied jujitsu for eight years. 2018 is Avery’s fourth festival. He thought Western North Carolina felt like a new American sub-culture compared to his birthplace in California and was grateful have Folkmoot as an opportunity to have access to international cultures.

 

 

 

Harper is a student at Tuscola High School who is excited to be returning to Folkmoot as an Assistant Guide. Last year he helped out in a variety of ways for including holding the role as lead on souvenirs and being an assistant guide. 2018 is Harper’s fourth festival. Harper is a stilt walker and plays the clarinet, piano, and various percussion instruments. Harper was also the president of the eighth-grade woodwinds and will be Drum Major for the Tuscola High School Marching Band this year.

 

 


Kaitlyn is a student at Tuscola High School where she participates in the Tuscola SWAT Team and is Librarian of Tuscola Band. “I am excited to be working as an Assistant Guide at Folkmoot because it is a great opportunity to experience different cultures and spread diversity throughout the community.”

 

 

 

Grace is a sophomore at Tuscola High School and has experienced many cultures through travels with her family. Grace has a passion for egalitarianism (the doctrine that all people are equal) and shares this value with the Folkmoot organization.  Grace lived in Singapore for two years and she embraced and enjoyed the cultural differences. Grace has helped run a nursery and served on the school’s volunteer outreach program.

 

 

Gracie is a high-school student who enjoys playing the piano and studying foreign languages. She is currently learning Spanish and French. Gracie has been an Assistant Guide for Peru, India and Dominican Republic. After her first festival, Gracie took a trip with her grandmother to Peru to visit the friends she had made at Folkmoot. 

 

 

 

Izzy is a returning Assistant Guide for Folkmoot. “During my time at Folkmoot during the last festival, I was able to experience some truly incredible escapades and would love to encounter more amazing events.” She was raised to respect people of all different races and religions.

 

 

 

 

Alma is a student at Tuscola High School, she enjoys playing her flute in the School’s symphonic band and marching piccolo in the Tuscola High School Marching Band. This will be Alma’s first year working with Folkmoot as an assistant guide and she is most excited about working with people from new and different cultures. She looks forward to meeting new friends and gaining new experiences you can only get from being involved in Folkmoot.

 

 

Jena is a student at Tuscola High school she is optimistic, enthusiastic and extremely excited to work with Folkmoot this year. Her favorite thing about Folkmoot is “being able to interact with different cultures other than her own.” She loves meeting new people that she can learn from and Folkmoot makes her want to keep learning about the world and everyone in it.

 

 

 

Andrea is a student at Tuscola High School where she participates in the Tuscola High School Marching Band, Winter Guard And she is HOSA Vice President. She enjoys playing her clarinet in the schools symphonic band and marching color guard in the schools marching band. Her favorite thing about Folkmoot is being able to interact with different people from around the world that she normally would not be able to meet without this organization.

 

 

Afton is a high school student at Tuscola, she enjoys playing her clarinet in the schools symphonic band and marching color guard in the schools Marching Band, she also enjoys participating in the schools Winter Guard. She enjoys traveling and seeing new places in the world. Her favorite thing about Folkmoot is seeing the diversity and different cultures all working together as well as making lifelong memories with amazing people.

 

 

Folkmoot's summer intern comes home, internationally! 

Connor is an undergraduate student at NC State. He enjoys studying languages and world politics. Over the past year, Connor lived in the Global Village at NC State with international students from over 20 different nations, so coming aboard as a guide will be a natural return to the type of international community he has grown accustomed to.

 

 

 

 

Garrett is a high school student at Tuscola, he plays the trumpet in many ensembles both on and off campus such as the Schools Marching Band and also plays in the school’s jazz band. Garrett is easy-going and will always bring a smile to your face. His favorite thing about Folkmoot is the music of the many cultures presented by the different groups.

 

 

 

Samual Eason Esquivel is 18 years old and a recent graduate of Cherokee High School, GO BRAVES! He loves acting and singing and will be going to school in NYC at AMDA in October for musical theater. He loves traveling and meeting new people. If he had a million dollars he would probably spend half of it on food. This is Easons first year as a guide but has worked with Folkmoot before as a Cherokee performer and ambassador.

 

Cherokee is fascinating for visiting Folkmoot performers!

Cherokee is fascinating for visiting Folkmoot performers!

Cherokee is fascinating for visiting Folkmoot performers!

The town of Cherokee and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians always draw the particular interest of international dance troupes visiting Western Carolina from around the globe for our annual Folkmoot Festival.

And for good reason, of course.

The story of the Cherokee people is both tragic and triumphant. Tsalagi history, heritage, legends and traditions are Smoky Mountain treasures more valuable than the gems once plentiful in these ancient peaks. It is rare, indeed, for international dancers to arrive without a thirst for more knowledge and understanding about First Nation people of America.

We expect the Folkmoot 2018 visiting dance troupes will be no exception. And, as an added element, at least 10 members of our visiting Le Ragazze Italiane dance troupe of Canada are also members of the Canadian Métis (pronounced, “maytee”) First Nation people. 

They will perform a special dance for Cherokee tribal leaders when the dancers visit the tribe on Cherokee Day, July 24.

Folkmoot 2018 opens July 19 and runs through July 29 and will feature performing dance troupes from Ghana, Italy, Czech Republic, Mexico, Thailland and Northern Cyprus and Venezuela as well as Anglo Appalachian and, as always, Cherokee dancers and musicians. 

Ticket packages and tickets for individual performances are available here.

Once here for the festival we invited you to stay awhile and enjoy all our beautiful region has to offer.

For it’s part, the tribe has assigned special representatives, officially designated ambassadors, outstanding young members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, to each of the visiting dance troupes to teach them about Cherokee tradition.

Cherokee is fascinating for visiting Folkmoot performers!
Amy West

Amy West attends Mars Hill University and is a senior studying elementary education. She is the president of their Native American Student Association. She enjoys babysitting and teaching Sunday school at Big Cove Baptist Church. This is her second year as an ambassador with the Folkmoot festival.

 

Cherokee is fascinating for visiting Folkmoot performers!
Mystikal Spirit Armachain

Mystikal Spirit Armachain is eighteen years old, her last name meaning “Backwater.” She is a member of the deer clan within the EBCI. She grew up traditionally learning her native language, crafts and traditions. Her native roots led her to work at the Oconaluftee Indian Village. This is her second year of being an ambassador for Folkmoot.

Cherokee is fascinating for visiting Folkmoot performers!
Karyl Frankiewicz

 

Karyl Frankiewicz is a former Miss Cherokee and former Miss Indian North Carolina. She is a second-time ambassador this year at the Folkmoot festival and does traditional craftwork such as beadwork, pottery, basketry, and finger weaving. She loves playing sports and has her own adult team for a local league.

 

Cherokee is fascinating for visiting Folkmoot performers!
Amorie Gunter

Amorie Gunter will be an ambassador for the second time at this year’s Folkmoot festival. She is last year’s Miss Cherokee and is currently a teacher at Cherokee Elementary School. She loves participating in the festival because it gives her an opportunity to learn about other cultures while educating others about her cultures, traditions, and home.

 

Cherokee is fascinating for visiting Folkmoot performers!
Faith Long

Faith Long is the current Miss Cherokee at nineteen years old. She is in the Jones-Bowman leadership award program and a business management major at Carson-Newman University. She is a 25 under 25 class of 2018 inductee for UNITY (United National Indian Tribal Youth).  She is excited to be a part of the festival this year.

 

Cherokee is fascinating for visiting Folkmoot performers!
Raylen Bark

Raylen Bark is the current Teen Miss Cherokee and her favorite sport to play is basketball. She attends Cherokee High School and her favorite color is blue. She’s excited to be a part of the festival this year.

 

Cherokee is fascinating for visiting Folkmoot performers!
Dvdaya Swimmer

Dvdaya Swimmer is the 11-year-old daughter of Micah and Carrah Swimmer. She is this year’s Junior Miss Cherokee and attends Cherokee Elementary in the fifth grade. She plays basketball, fastpitch softball, performs Cherokee social dances, dances fancy shawl at powwows, and is on the Smoky Mountain Youth Competition Cheer team. Her life goal is to be a representation of her Cherokee people and give her best shot at life and giving back.

Folkmoot and so much more in these beautiful Smoky Mountains!

Folkmoot and so much more in these beautiful Smoky Mountains!

Folkmoot and so much more in these beautiful Smoky Mountains!

Oh sure, we know Folkmoot Festival 2018 may be your main reason for visiting Western North Carolina in less than two weeks.

But, really, you can’t do Folkmoot all the time. There are still 24 hours in a day and so much more going on – and to see and do – in the summer time in our glorious Smokies!!

Folkmoot 2018 opens July 19 and runs through July 29 and will feature performing dance troupes from Ghana, Italy, Czech Republic, Mexico, Thailland and Northern Cyprus and Venezuela as well as Anglo Appalachian and, as always, Cherokee dancers and musicians. 

Ticket packages and tickets for individual performances are available here.

We’re glad your coming and we bid you welcome to the mountains of Western Carolina and to Haywood County.  We invite you to stay longer to explore our communities and enjoy all there is to do and see.  

You can learn so much more at our official (and expert) visitors’ site: VisitNCSmokies but here is a sampling of just some of the other activities taking place during or near Folkmoot Festival time. And in between activities you’ll want to dine and refuel at many of our lovely restaurants. 

July 6-29

Folkmoot and so much more in these beautiful Smoky Mountains! Mame

This hilarious musical follows the eccentric life of Auntie Mame, a New York intellectual who pushes against the rigid social norms of the early 20th century. Based on the novel and play, Auntie Mame, by Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin

HART Theatre, 

 

July 13 & July 29

Folkmoot and so much more in these beautiful Smoky Mountains! Waynesville Mountain Street Dance

Downtown Waynesville, NC

The late evening dance has been going on for nearly a century. In the 1930’s Haywood County resident Sam Queen, known as “the dancing-est man in the land” organized the Soco Gap Dance Team, which was among the very first practiced mountain square dance and clogging demonstration teams in the country. Today his grandson, Joe Sam Queen, carries on the tradition.

July 29th dance is Folkmoot Night! – Live mountain music, clogging, and square dancing!

 

July 27 & 28

Folkmoot and so much more in these beautiful Smoky Mountains! Hillbilly Jam

Maggie Valley, NC

Hillbilly Jam features loads of live Music, Food, Crafts, Cornhole, Car & Bike Show, TV Celebrities and Moonshiners.

 

July 20 & July 27

Folkmoot and so much more in these beautiful Smoky Mountains! Pickin’ In the Park

Canton Recreation Park

Country and Bluegrass music and clogging performances!

 

 

August 4-5

Folkmoot and so much more in these beautiful Smoky Mountains! Lake Logan Multisport Festival

The 2018 Lake Logan Multisport Festival returns for its thirteenth year on August 4 & 5, and will retain the same schedule as the past three years with the Lake Logan Half on Saturday and the international and sprint races taking place on the Sunday. All three races are sanctioned by USA Triathlon and are part of the North Carolina Triathlon Series managed by Set Up Events.

 

 

And you might want to visit some of our famous destinations!!

 

Cataloochee Valley

This is one of the most beautiful areas within the Great Smoky Mountains and nestled in Haywood County.  Cataloochee was once a popular place for settlement and grew into a mountain community. Many original homesteads are still standing and visitors can experience the rich history of the valley. Visitors can tour the school, churches, barns, and several different homes to get a look at what life was like for the settlers. There are also many hiking trails and fishing spots to add to an adventure at Cataloochee Valley.

 

Graveyard Trails

This is a 3.2-mile roundtrip trail fun for the whole family and known for its beauty and its ease. The hike leads to three impressive waterfalls, an open, grassy area and pools for wading on a hot summer day. There is an abundance of blueberries near the falls so bringing a bucket for blueberry picking is encouraged. The trail begins at Graveyard Fields Overlook on the Blue Ridge Parkway from the U.S. Highway 276 junction.

 

Richland Balsam

This trail leads visitors to the highest peak of the Blue Ridge Parkway reaching 6,410 feet. To get to the peak, visitors take a 1.5-mile trail that passes through a spruce-fir forest. Blackberries and elderberries are there for the picking! Milepost 431 is a great stop for pictures.

 

Biltmore Estates

The Biltmore is America’s largest home and one of Western North Carolina’s biggest attractions. The home was built in 1895 by George Vanderbilt and has a total of 250 rooms. Along with the elegance of the home are magnificent gardens and vineyards. Just outside the Biltmore’s entrance is the Biltmore Village where visitors can shop and dine. You can reach the Biltmore via I-40, exit 50.

 

Great Smoky Mountain Railroad

Located in the heart of Bryson City is the Great Smoky Mountain Railroad. Enjoy the history and scenery of the Smokies on this tour. Various train excursions are offered.  During the time of the festival, the Smoky Mountain Railroad is running a Tuskegee Excursion and the Wizard of Oz Train Ride.

 

And visit our superb eating & drinking establishments!

 

Southern Porch

Southern Porch is a family owned restaurant where the food is fresh and made from scratch. A dollar for each tap purchased will be donated towards Folkmoot during the festival.

117 Main St, Canton

Bearwater Brewery

Try out one or all of Bearwater’s delicious signature beers! Take some to go with 20% off growler fills during the week of the festival. 130 Frasier St, Waynesville

Frog Level Brewery

Quench your thirst with the smooth craft beer in the tasting room or get a growler to go!  56 Commerce St, Waynesville

Kanini’s

Food brings people together – this is the same in almost any culture.  Eating with friends and family should be satisfying, intimate and fun.  Try the Folkmoot Salad!! 1196 N. Main Street, Waynesville

Birchwood Hall Southern Kitchen

We offer a humble selection of handcrafted creations from the finest locally and regionally sourced ingredients. Birchwood Hall passionately showcases a farm-to-table approach deeply rooted in Southern tradition. Each dish pays homage to the down-home warmth of Southern cuisine with an eclectic, modern twist. We’re honored that you’ve chosen our table and look forward to serving your meal with the utmost pride and care. 111 N Main St, Waynesville

Firefly Taps & Grill

Delicious authentic American cuisine.  Great wine & beer selections. Now serving Sunday brunch. 128 N. Main St, Waynesville

Sauced

Main Street Waynesville’s most recent culinary addition: pizza, tacos, taps. 190 Main Street, Waynesville

Bocelli’s Italian Eatery

Pasta, fresh fish, sauces/dough homemade, hand-tossed brink oven pizza/calzone.  319 N. Haywood St., Waynesville

Boojum Brewing Company

Lunch, Dinner & Drinks. Choose from 16 taps of fresh, delicious BOOJUM BEER plus wine & craft cocktails. Our menu features seasonal pub faire including burgers, sandwiches, & daily specials. 50 N. Main St., Waynesville

PUB 319

12 local microbrew taps, specialty cocktails. Chef inspired pub fare-hand patted burgers, wings, homemade sauces & more. 17 flat screen TV’s so you don’t miss a game! 319 N. Haywood St., Waynesville

Bogart’s Restaurant

American Cuisine, Daily Specials, Steaks, Burgers, Soups, Salads. A Hometown Favorite! 303 S. Main St., Waynesville

Chef’s Table

Enjoy food, wine & friends with house made pastas, breads made from scratch everyday, fresh seafood & USDA choice/higher grade Black Angus beef. Full bar, Award winning wine list, Reservations recommended. 30 Church St., Waynesville

Church Street Depot

Mouthwatering all beef burgers & dogs, real ice cream shakes & floats, hand cut fries. Locally sourced beef. Bottled sodas/beer/wine, fresh brewed iced tea. All food/drink is high fructose corn syrup FREE. Outdoor dining available. 34 Church St., Waynesville

Classic Wineseller

Come Share Our Passion – Wine, Beer, Cigars, Food, LIVE Music. Retail hours: 11am-6pm, Tues-Sat. Restaurant Opens @ 4pm Wed-Sat serving charcuterie, tapas & small plates. LIVE Music every Fri & Sat @ 7pm year around. 20 Church St., Waynesville

Cork & Cleaver

At The Waynesville Inn Upscale dining experience. Natural steaks, chops, fresh seafood. Full bar available, local microbrew beers & sustainable wines. Call for seasonal hours. 176 Country Club Dr., Waynesville

Frogs Leap Public House

A farm to table restaurant & pub serving modern regional dishes featuring local products. Wood Grilled Steaks & Chops/Mountain Trout/Local Beer, Wine & Liquor. 44 Church St., Waynesville

Kandi’s Cake and Bake Shop

Danish, éclairs, cream horns, cinni-rolls, cupcakes, brownies, tea balls, date bars, variety of cookies, southern style cannolis, custom cakes – round & sheet. 200 S Main St., Waynesville

Panacea Coffee House

CAFÉ & ROASTERY Homemade eats, treats, & creekside seats. In-house coffee roasting, full-service espresso bar, sandwiches, soups, & salads. 66 Commerce St, Waynesville

The Patio Bistro
Fresh for BREAKFAST! Coffee, muffins, cinnamon rolls, breakfast burritos and sandwiches. Open till 4pm serving homemade quiche, soups, wraps, salads, and sandwiches. Buddha bowls, Delicious desserts. Friendly staff, indoor/outdoor seating, pet friendly patio, catering, picnic lunches to go. 26 Church St., Waynesville

Smoky Mountain Sub Shop

A Folkmoot staff favorite! Serving downtown for over 20 years! Offering subs, sandwiches, burgers, hot dogs, wraps, salads, personal pizzas & more! Just a few steps off Main Street. Monthly SPECIALS, Free delivery downtown, a local favorite. 29 Miller St., Waynesville

The Strand @ 38main

MOVIES, MUSIC, & Ice Cream Parlor Serving Craft Beer, Wine. Locally Made Ice Cream.  Check First Run Movie & Live Entertainment Schedule! 38 N. Main St., Waynesville

Sunburst Market

A neighborhood specialty grocery focusing on natural & local ingredients. Offering beer, wine, produce, trout, meats, cheeses, as well as natural & organic soaps, lotions, candles & household cleaners. 142 N. Main St, Waynesville

Sweet Onion

Casual Dining, Regional Cuisine, a Continued Favorite among Locals & Guests, Mountain Views. 39 Miller St., Waynesville

TAP ROOM Sports Bar & Grill

At The Waynesville Inn, casual & fun dining atmosphere. Enjoy an array of sandwiches, salads, soups, entrees. Full bar with a large selection of beer & wine. 176 Country Club Dr., Waynesville

Trailhead Café & Bakery

A New Concept with a New Locally Inspired Menu: Opening early with a Heavy Coffee Focus with Coffee Bar, Breakfast items including Donuts & NY Bagels. Serving a variety of Soups, Salads, Sandwiches & more It will be “Worth the Wait”. 18 N. Main St., Waynesville

Waynesville Pizza Company

Pizzas, Burgers, Wraps, Salads, Subs, Sandwiches, Domestic & Local Handcrafted Beers, Large bar, Flat screen TVs, Outdoor seating. 32 Felmet St., Waynesville

Frankie’s Trattoria

A true Italian trattoria serving up authentic dishes in a casual environment.  1037 Soco Road, Maggie Valley

J. Arthur’s

For more than 25 years J Arthur’s has been a landmark in Maggie Valley.  2843 Soco Road, Maggie Valley

Clyde’s Restaurant

A landmark since the 1940s, Clyde’s is the perfect spot to fuel up for a day of adventure.  2107 S Main Street, Waynesville

Jukebox Junction

This family 1950s-themed diner specializes in sumptuous sandwiches and home-made ice cream.  6306 Pigeon Road, Canton

Dickey’s Barbeque Pit

authenticity, innovation and barbecue sauce, one store at a time. With roots in Dallas, Travis Dickey set out to perfect Texas-style barbecue. 66 New Clyde Hwy, Canton

 

Accommodations? We have thousands of beautiful places to stay!

Click to VisitNCSmokies – operated by the Haywood County Tourism and Development Office – to learn more about lodging and accommodations.

It could be argued sleeping in the Smokies – for two or three (or more) nights – might be the best part of attending Folkmoot 2018 Festival.

Best Western Smoky Mountain Inn, at a central location in Waynesville, this Inn offers comfort and easy to Haywood County visitors.  To make reservations call, 828-456-4402.

Lake Junaluska Conference & Retreat Center has a wide variety of accommodations only a short walk to two of the biggest Folkmoot performances.  To make reservations call, 800-222-4930 or visit the LJA accommodations website linked above.

Folkmoot’s Parade of Nations: July 21 on Main Street in Waynesville!

Folkmoot's Parade of Nations: July 21 on Main Street in Waynesville!

Folkmoot’s Parade of Nations: July 21 on Main Street in Waynesville!

One of Folkmoot’s most cherished traditions, the annual Parade of Nations, is always free to the public and among the most fun-filled, colorful and family-friendly events of the entire 10-day Folkmoot Festival.

And it happens in the middle of downtown Waynesville – right down Main Street. The parade will begin at 10 a.m. The parade is just part of the big opening weekend of Folkmoot!

Folkmoot 2018 opens July 19 and runs through July 29 and will feature performing dance troupes from Ghana, Italy, Czech Republic, Mexico, Thailland and Northern Cyprus and Venezuela as well as Anglo Appalachian and, as always, Cherokee dancers and musicians. 

Ticket packages and tickets for individual performances are available here.

Folkmoot's Parade of Nations: July 21 on Main Street in Waynesville!As they have for 35 years now. each participating dance troupe – our international visitors as well as our regional troupes – march down Waynesville’s Main Street, stopping at intervals to showcase dance moves and traditional clothing to spectators along the sidewalk before ending with a grand performance on the steps of Haywood County’s Historic Courthouse.

The parade is one of the best chances for festival goers to see each group before most of the ticketed performances. The Parade of Nations is great activity for the whole family as people of all ages are sure to see world cultures presented in ways that will certainly entertain and inform.

Stick around after the parade to join us for the Many Cultures Day street fair at Folkmoot Center (the historic Hazelwood School)!

Many Cultures Day is a good opportunity to meet and interact with some of the performers. They will be participating in all kinds of activities with festival goers: crafts, dance lessons and games.

The event will feature live music, 30 different vendors and various ethnic food trucks. There is a $5 entrance fee, but children 5 and under get in free.

All these events and more are part of the opening and closing weekends of the 10 days of Folkmoot 2018.

When Waynesville surgeon, Dr. Clinton Border, returned home after seeing a dance team at an English folk festival, he thought such a festival would be perfect for Western North Carolina, which had its own rich history of preserving its traditional culture.  It took from 1973, when Border made his trip, to 1984 before the first Folkmoot USA event took place.  That year, symbolic as it was also the year that North Carolina celebrated its 400th birthday, welcomed performers from England, Germany, Holland, Ireland, Turkey, Mexico, Puerto Rico and India.

In 2002, the Folkmoot Friendship Center leased the former Hazelwood Elementary School, thus giving it a home to expand its programming and activities.  In 2014, the Haywood County school system donated the school to the organization.  Now, this multi-faceted space has created an expanded opportunity for Folkmoot to move from a two week festival to a year-round cultural center, focusing on programs and events that celebrate diversity and differences, encourage cultural conversation and inclusion, and preserve and honor worldwide cultural heritages, especially using dance as a tool to achieve world peace.

Since these humble yet visionary beginnings in 1984, more than 8,000 international performers from 200 countries have entertained and thrilled residents and guests of Western North Carolina.

Folkmoot's Parade of Nations: July 21 on Main Street in Waynesville!

The Folkmoot volunteer spotlight falls on George Thomas

The Folkmoot volunteer spotlight falls on George Thomas

The Folkmoot volunteer spotlight falls on George Thomas.

If you have noticed our refreshing gardened shrubs and flower beds you can thank George!

After 21 years of teaching Horticulture at Haywood Community College, George retired and now spends his time volunteering at Folkmoot – while also enjoying his hobbies of gardening, stamp collecting, and traveling.

While teaching horticulture at Haywood Community College, George’s class volunteered at the Folkmoot Friendship Center. During the recently ended academic year his class de-weeded, planted and mulched 467 feet along the front perimeter of the Center.

Folkmoot 2018 opens July 19 and runs through July 29 and will feature performing dance troupes from Ghana, Italy, Czech Republic, Mexico, Thailland and Northern Cyprus and Venezuela as well as Anglo Appalachian and, as always, Cherokee dancers and musicians. 

Ticket packages and tickets for individual performances are available here.

The Folkmoot volunteer spotlight falls on George Thomas
George Thomas, Folkmoot Volunteer Spotlight

George first heard about Folkmoot and our gardening needs from one of his close friends, Dr. Barbara Parker, who suggested that George volunteer with his wide range of gardening and landscaping skills.

Being active members in the Haywood community, George and his family have been attending Folkmoot events for many years. As a volunteer, George values how Folkmoot brings the community together.

“Three important aspects that Folkmoot produces are goodwill, fellowship and public relations”, George said.

He added how he greatly appreciates the opportunity to volunteer with an organization which hosts groups from other nations.

He says the Grand Opening at Lake Junaluska and the Parade of Nations are his two favorite events during the festival. He describes these events as colorful. George also loves the sense of international pageantry these two events bring to the community.

We want to thank George for all that he does for Folkmoot. He is a highly valued volunteer, has a positive attitude and represents Folkmoot’s values.

We are thankful for everything he has offered through his time volunteering. George encourages the community to check-out Folkmoot’s year-round programs.

For more information or to volunteer, please contact Catherine MacCallum, Operations and Volunteer Coordinator: 828-452-2997, x105. Or fill out this online form.

When Waynesville surgeon, Dr. Clinton Border, returned home after seeing a dance team at an English folk festival, he thought such a festival would be perfect for Western North Carolina, which had its own rich history of preserving its traditional culture.  It took from 1973, when Border made his trip, to 1984 before the first Folkmoot USA event took place.  That year, symbolic as it was also the year that North Carolina celebrated its 400th birthday, welcomed performers from England, Germany, Holland, Ireland, Turkey, Mexico, Puerto Rico and India.

In 2002, the Folkmoot Friendship Center leased the former Hazelwood Elementary School, thus giving it a home to expand its programming and activities.  In 2014, the Haywood County school system donated the school to the organization.  Now, this multi-faceted space has created an expanded opportunity for Folkmoot to move from a two week festival to a year-round cultural center, focusing on programs and events that celebrate diversity and differences, encourage cultural conversation and inclusion, and preserve and honor worldwide cultural heritages, especially using dance as a tool to achieve world peace.

Since these humble yet visionary beginnings in 1984, more than 8,000 international performers from 200 countries have entertained and thrilled residents and guests of Western North Carolina.

Please help us gather craft supplies for kids!

Please help us gather craft supplies for kids!

Please help us gather craft supplies for kids!

Creating cultural crafts is a Folkmoot Festival tradition and an activity in which hundreds of kids love to participate each year.

Folkmoot Festival 2018 will feature kid-friendly, cultural arts and crafts at Camp Folkmoot, Many Cultures Day, and International Day. To make our kids’ craft programs a success, we need your help! Please help us gather craft supplies – donations of supplies or cash are welcome. Volunteers can contact Catherine MacCallum, 828.452.2997, or fill out this online form (and, please, note “craft donation” on the form). 

The crafts planned for 2018 are inspired by traditional crafts from The Netherlands, Israel, Russia, India, and from Native Americans handicraft. We need help gathering supplies such as: rubber bands, yarn, Playdoh, duct tape of all colors, glue sticks, Scotch Tape, washi Tape, streamers and detergent.

Crafting supplies and donations will be happily accepted at the Folkmoot Friendship Center located at 112 Virginia Avenue, Waynesville.  

Folkmoot 2018 opens July 19 and runs through July 29 and will feature performing dance troupes from Ghana, Italy, Czech Republic, Mexico, Thailland and Northern Cyprus and Venezuela as well as Anglo Appalachian and, as always, Cherokee dancers and musicians. 

Ticket packages and tickets for individual performances are available here.

Camp Folkmoot – Hands around the Globe, July 20 – 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., $30. Youth dancers of all abilities who are inspired by folk dance and live music can learn international folk dance with Ambassador performers from around the globe. Learn basic concepts and movements, gain an appreciation of the similarities and differences between cultures, and hear the timeless, captivating stories behind the dances of each international group. The day includes “make-and-take” cultural crafts and culminates in a short performance with the groups and community participants. Families and youth groups are encouraged to register. Snacks, lunch, and drinks will be provided. Discounts are available to groups of four or more if pre-registered together. For more information or to register for camp, contact Elizabeth Burson, 828.452.2997.

Many Cultures Day, July 21, 2017 – 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., $5 admission. Scheduled for immediately after the Parade of Nations in downtown Waynesville, this event features 30-vendors, youth activities hosted by community groups, ethnic food trucks, international performers, community dance lessons, a youth performance stage with local youth fiddlers and dancers; additionally, there will be two Cherokee stickball game demonstrations. The cost of this outdoor festival is $5 for individuals over 5 years old.

International Festival Day, July 28, 2017-10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. A Folkmoot Festival tradition on Main Street. Folkmoot will host artisan vendors, food vendors and our international groups on Main Street of Waynesville.

Please help us gather craft supplies for kids!

Coming right up: two huge Folkmoot weekends!

Coming right up: two huge Folkmoot weekends!

Coming right up: two huge Folkmoot weekends!

And, yes, Folkmoot Festival 2018 – Folkmoot’s 35th edition – will bring folk dance, color, music & pageantry all over Western North Carolina for 10 days but it’s the opening weekend and finale weekend which offer the most activity – and much of it is free!!

Folkmoot 2018 opens July 19 and runs through July 29 and will feature performing dance troupes from Ghana, Italy, Czech Republic, Mexico, Thailland and Northern Cyprus and Venezuela as well as Anglo Appalachian and, as always, Cherokee dancers and musicians. 

Ticket packages and tickets for individual performances are available here.

Opening Weekend!

Opening weekend kicks off with the groups’ arrival July 18th in Waynesville and charges immediately into events and performances.

Friends of Folkmoot Gala Understand the Stars is the kick-off July 19 and one of the festival’s most treasured and festive events with performances of all the visiting troupes and a chance to meet our visitors in person.

Kids just naturally want to dance and at Folkmoot 2018 they will be able to do exactly that – with the performers – at Camp Folkmoot! The one-day, all-immersive dance camp will be part of the Folkmoot 2018 Festival and is set for July 20!

The Grand Opening Matinee is set for July 20 in Queen Auditorium, Folkmoot Center. All groups will perform followed by cultural conversations with the audience and dance troupe members.

The Grand Opening Extravaganza at Lake Junaluska’s Stuart Auditorium, always one of the festival’s highlights!

The First Saturday, has it’s come to be known and this year is July 21 is jam-packed with huge events, free-and-open-to-the-public events and more fun than – maybe, not really – anyone should expect to have in a single day!

First Saturday kicks off with one of the most popular events each year of the entire festival: the Parade of Nations down Main Street, Waynesville. Always colorful and exciting, the whole of Western Carolina (it seems) turns out to see our visiting international dance troupes, local and international musicians, favorite Appalachian and mountain dance troupes all perform and frolic down the main drag of our picturesque mountain town.

Kids, parents, grandparents, adults of all varieties revel in the pageantry and exhilaration of the festive vibe.

First Saturday of Folkmoot 2018 is jam-packedCome to our Folkmoot International Center immediately after the Parade of Nations for Many Cultures Day. The event lasts until 4 p.m. and features 30-vendors, youth activities hosted by community groups, ethnic food trucks, international performers, community dance lessons, and a youth performance stage with local youth fiddlers and dancers. There also will be two Cherokee stickball game demonstrations. The cost of this outdoor festival is $5 for individuals over 5 years old. Visit the Many Cultures Day event post on Facebook, tag “going” and share it on your profile or with friends!

A full performance by all visiting dance troupes at Haywood Community College caps off the day at 7 p.m.! One of the most popular performances of the festival each year, the first HCC performance is always a fun-filled event and moderately priced so the whole family can enjoy the show! Visit the Haywood Community College performance event post on Facebook, tag “going” and share it on your profile or with friends!

Sunday Soirée is set for July 22 – The community is invited to experience the foods of our eight visiting world cultures, presented by the chefs of the Blind Pig Supper Club with entertainment provided by regional youth celebrating cultural arts. Performers will represent Appalachian, African, American Jazz and Cherokee cultures and then meet and greet Folkmoot’s international performers over dessert!

Folkmoot also travels to Hickory, NC, on July 22 for two performances, 2 p.m. & 5 p.m. Hosted by the Hickory International Council in the Drendel Auditorium (4 groups) *includes post-performance Cultural Conversations. Tickets will be available through the International Council & Drendel Auditorium when they are made available. 

Finale Weekend!

Folkmoot 2o18’s Finale Weekend launches from Asheville and lands for the always emotional and powerful closing ceremonies at Lake Junaluska’s Stuart Auditorium.

July 27: Asheville, North Carolina. A 2 p.m. matinee in the Diana Wortham Theatre. A 7 p.m. performance in the Diana Wortham Theatre.

July 28: International Festival Day – Downtown Waynesville, North Carolina. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Another free and public event, a wonderful day of celebrating international friendships and cultural exchange!

July 28: Performance of all groups at Haywood Community College, 7 p.m.

July 29: Candlelight Closing, Stuart Auditorium, Lake Junaluska, North Carolina. A rich, colorful & emotional last festival performance filled with tradition, joys and even a few tears!

Be a Folkmoot insider

Show your love of international culture and the legacy of Folkmoot and dress in your best cultural regalia for Folkmoot performances! The public is encouraged to join the fun by sharing their own cultural heritage at all Folkmoot events. As an example, individuals with Scottish heritage are invited to wear their kilt to any Folkmoot performances. Cultural exchange and celebration are at the heart of Folkmoot.  Dress to impress and Folkmoot will feature a photo of you on our Instagram and Facebook pages!

Be a Folkmoot supporter

Folkmoot is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization that relies on donations, sponsorships, grants, ticket sales, and Friends of Folkmoot members to produce the Folkmoot Festival each year. Everyone can celebrate and support Folkmoot programs by becoming a member through the Friends of Folkmoot by clicking here. Donations support community-building events for kids and families and support our international guests during their stay in Waynesville at the Historic Hazelwood School

Be a Folkmoot volunteer

Volunteers are still needed to prepare for our visitors and for support during the festival. If you, your company, church or civic group would like to help, please contact Catherine MacCallum at 828-452-2997, or fill out our online form

Folkmoot: the dream of 1973 lives on in 2018!

Folkmoot: the dream of 1973 lives on in 2018!

Folkmoot: the dream of 1973 lives on in 2018!

With increasing excitement, building day-by-day, we’re all looking forward to July 19 when Folkmoot Festival 2018 opens with music and folk dancing and international cultural exchange and parties and so much fun from around the globe we will barely be able to contain ourselves.

And it’s been this way every year for the past 35 years!

Folkmoot 2018 opens July 19 and runs through July 29 and will feature performing dance troupes from Ghana, Italy, Czech Republic, Mexico, Thailland and Northern Cyprus and Venezuela as well as Anglo Appalachian and, as always, Cherokee dancers and musicians. 

Ticket packages and tickets for individual performances are available here.

When Waynesville surgeon, Dr. Clinton Border, visited an English folk festival in 1973, he couldn’t let go of the idea that such an event would be a perfect opportunity for Western North Carolina to showcase its own rich cultural heritage while it welcomed the world to its mountains.  

Although it took another ten years before the festival became a reality, the idea had taken hold of Border, who soon shared his dream with others.

Here from the beginning: Rolf Kaufman

Folkmoot: the dream of 1973 lives on in 2018!
Rolf Kaufman with dancers from 2016

A neighbor of Border’s, Rolf Kaufman, was invited to a community “chat” to discuss what some thought was a far-fetched idea.  Not Rolf. Though Kaufman knew little about folk dance, he knew a lot about the value of people coming together (“Folkmoot”), sharing culture and customs and learning that at the end of the day, we are all more alike than we are different.  

An immigrant whose family left Nazi Germany and landed in Waynesville, Kaufman was “sold right away” on Border’s vision.

“I became fascinated by the dance component later on but was more fascinated by the groups who visited,” Kaufman recalls today. “I knew that once we all connected, these people could never be our enemies.”

Kaufman remains an avid supporter (time, treasure, talent) of Folkmoot and remains largely responsible for scouting and selecting many of our visiting dance troupes.  

Beyond the festival’s economic impact on the region, Kaufman is most impressed with and proud of Folkmoot’s ability to change lives – most notably – young people’s lives.  

“Over the years, we have had hundreds of young people serves as interns, guides, and volunteers,” he explains. “Many have shared that their Folkmoot experience impacted their choice of career, gave them life-long friends, and helped deepen their level of global understanding and compassion.”

Noting that Folkmoot has become a year round source and site of cultural programs, Kaufman supports the organization’s new efforts to do even more to reach youth and families while preserving its reputation overseas as the premier international folk festival in the eastern half of the U.S.

Marty Scott, Appalachian Groups Coordinator

On that 1973 trip Dr. Border took to England was a young Haywood County teen, Marty Scott, who was part of a clogging troupe competing at the overseas event.

That trip was part of a larger clogging journey lasting nearly all of his 57 years. The life-long love of Appalachian dancing doesn’t surprise him but Scott, an eight generation Haywood County resident, could have hardly imagined then that in 2018, he would be charged with the important job of picking, choosing and scheduling all of the American Appalachian dancing troupes participating in Folkmoot 2018.  (Scott will be dancing with the Appalachian Mountaineers, a troupe of which he has been a part since 1997).

Beyond the sheer joy of heritage dance – or witnessing it – Scott loves Folkmoot’s ability to “bring so many cultures together, getting to know people and people sharing things about their lives.”  

“Over the recent years,  I’ve noticed the audiences getting more involved and connected; they’re less closed off to others,” he added. “That’s what makes Folkmoot so special.”

Dr. Border would be smiling, too.

Folkmoot: the dream of 1973 lives on in 2018!

 

 

 

Learn to say, “peace,” in many languages

Learn to say, "peace," in many languages

Learn to say, “peace,” in many languages during Folkmoot 2018 – it’s a word you will likely hear quite a bit.

Folkmoot has long been a festival which bridges cultural differences, expands cultural horizons and builds peace and understanding through the celebration of tradition and dance.

The more we know and understand each other – our cultures, our heritage – the easier it become to live in peace.

Folkmoot 2018 opens July 19 and runs through July 29 and will feature performing dance troupes from Ghana, Italy, Czech Republic, Mexico, Thailland and Northern Cyprus and Venezuela as well as Anglo Appalachian and, as always, Cherokee dancers and musicians. 

Ticket packages and tickets for individual performances are available here.

We’ll have many opportunities to learn the words for, “peace,” throughout the 10 days of Folkmoot Festival 2018. 

Here are some international translations, from the languages of our visiting dance troupes, which can help share the peace:

Ghana

Learn to say, "peace," in many languages
Nkrabea Dance Ensemble

Asomdwoe (Akan aka Twi) – Nkrabea Dance Ensemble of Accra, Ghana is just one of the many treasures awaiting Folkmoot 2018 festival goers. Nkrabea is one of the most powerful and entertaining cultural groups performing in Africa today.  The group is filled with young, talented Ghanaians who are, by any standards, dedicated to and passionate about what they do.

Italian

Pace (P-Ah-ch-e) – Le Ragazze Italiane will be one of the featured performing dance troupes during Folkmoot Festival 2018. Le Ragazze has been together since 2007 and combined bring together over 50 years of experience, sharing their love of Italian culture, music and dance with diverse audiences. 

Spanish

Paz – We have two dance troupes coming from Spanish-speaking countries: “Fiesta Mexicana” Ballet Folklorico of Monterrey, often known by its acronym, BOFOFIM, is sure to be a popular entry into the Folkmoot 2018 Festival line-up and the rich tradition of Venezuelan folkloric dance and music will come alive on stage with Viva Venezuela by Sentir Venezolano, featuring renowned choreographer Judith Perez and a diverse Afro-Latino ensemble cast!

Czech

MírThe Folk Ensemble Kašava of the Czech Republic will be here. Kašava was founded in 1971 in a village of the same name, situated in the northern part of the Zlin region of the Czech Republic.

Turkish

(Northern Cyprus) – Barış (the ı is pronounced as a cross between an English e and an i; ş is pronounced like “sh.”) Kyrenia Youth Centre Association will bring its traditional Turkish-Cypriot dance, music & costumes to be a highlight of Folkmoot in its 35th Edition.

Thai

สันติภาพ (santipap) – The Lampang Kalayanee School of the Lampang Province of Thailand is bringing its traditional and beautiful ancient folk dance to the Smoky Mountains for Folkmoot 2018!

Cherokee

ᏙᎯᏱ (dohiyi) – The Warriors of AniKituhwa, the traditional dance troupe of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, are always a popular feature of any Folkmoot Festival. And even though they are the only true native people of our beloved Smoky Mountians, our Cherokee neighbors have a language other than English, too.

Appalachian

Peace, ya’ll! – When driving down the road or simply passing by another individual in Appalachia, the most common non-verbal way to give peace is to give a slight head nod with a “one-finger-wave.”  

All of the translations came from this helpful and convenient guide.

One last note, maybe helpful: the common sign for peace – two fingers raised, as often seen in America – may be misinterpreted when traveling outside the U.S. and into different cultures.

We might not all realize the direction one’s palm while the two fingers are raised can be a deciding factor in whether or not a greeting is friendly. In many parts of the world, this gesture with an inward facing palm is used as an insult.

In more modern times, the gesture is commonly known around the world as a sign of goodwill, neighborliness, and benevolence, but there are still some misinterpretations.

Remember! when giving a peace sign, keep your palm facing outward.

Hey, y’all! Say, “hello,” in the languages of Folkmoot

Hey, y'all! Say, "hello," in the languages of Folkmoot

Hey, y’all! Say, “hello,” in the languages of Folkmoot.

In less than a month, we’ll be the host to folk dancers, musicians and support people from seven nations around the globe, all with special and beautiful languages all their own. And while none of us can expect to become proficient in all those languages, we can share a simple, “hello,” in different languages and teach our visitors how to say, “hello,” in our region: “hey y’all!”

Folkmoot 2018 opens July 19 and runs through July 29 and will feature performing dance troupes from Ghana, Italy, Czech Republic, Mexico, Thailland and Northern Cyprus and Venezuela as well as Anglo Appalachian and, as always, Cherokee dancers and musicians. 

Ticket packages and tickets for individual performances are available here.

Getting to know international visitors begins with the easy effort to be friendly.  A simple and respectful greeting is the warmest way to welcome the world to western North Carolina.

Here are just some of the ways we can say, “hello,” during Folkmoot 2018:

Ghana

The Nkrabea Dance Ensemble of Accra, Ghana is just one of the many treasures awaiting festival goers. We can say hello: “Ete Sen

Even though English is the official language of Ghana, it is a multilingual country where roughly 80 languages are spoken. Akan, the native language of the Akan people of Ghana, is spoken by over half of the population. The West African handshake is used as a greeting in Ghana, where the middle finger snaps the middle finger of the person whose hand is being shaken. The louder the snap, the better. It is acceptable to try the snap a second time if the first attempt is missed. Ete Sen can be translated to “how are you” in English.  

Italian

Hey, y'all! Say, "hello," in the languages of FolkmootLe Ragazze Italiane will be one of the featured performing dance troupes during Folkmoot Festival 2018 and many festival attendees will already know how to say, “hello,” in Italian: “Ciao! or Buongiorno!

Ciao! can be used to say “Hi”, “Hello”, as well as “goodbye.” A more formal greeting is Buongiorno! which literally means “good day,” but it can also mean “good morning” or “good afternoon.” In the evening, it is more common to hear Buonasera! In Italy, it is important to greet each person, even if they are in a group, with a firm handshake while saying the appropriate greeting for the time of day.

Czech

The Folk Ensemble Kašava of the Czech Republic is sure to be a big hit at the 2018 festival!

We can say, “hello,” like this: “Dobrý den! (Doh-bree den) or Ahoj! (a(h)-hoy).”

Ahoj! is the informal greeting and is used for friends and relatives. Formal greetings vary depending on the time of day. The most common is Dobrý den! and is used from late morning until early evening.  Dobrý den! literally translates to “good day!” Greetings are fairly similar in the U.S. in that a small wave or gesture of the hand is used.  

Northern Cyprus

The Kyrenia Youth Centre Association of Northern Cyprus will bring its traditional Turkish-Cypriot dance, music & costumes to be a highlight of Folkmoot in its 35th Edition.

In Turkish, we can say, “Merhaba!

The island of Cyprus in the Mediterranean is split into two sovereign states. Greek is the dominant language of the southern state while Turkish is dominant in the north. While English is spoken on the whole island, the locals enjoy seeing visitors try their hand at the Turkish language. The most basic greeting is Merhaba and it translates directly as “Hello!”  

Thai

The Lampang Kalayanee School of Thailand is bringing its traditional and beautiful ancient folk dance to the Smoky Mountains!

Here is how we will say, hello: สวัสดี! (S̄wạs̄dī!) [Sa-wad-dee]

In Thailand and other Buddhist societies, greeting others is known as giving wâi. When you greet somebody you first gently put your palms together at your chest, with your elbows relaxed, and bow your head down to your thumbs at different points of contact depending on the level of respect you have towards the individual to whom you are giving wâi. The highest level of respect is given to monks, while the second level of respect is for elders. For the first level of respect, used for others on the same level such as friends, co-workers, or neighbors, your head is bowed down so that your thumbs meet your chin.  There is also a universal form of giving wâi where you just bow your head toward your thumb but make no point of contact.

Mexico

“Fiesta Mexicana” Ballet Folklorico of Monterrey, often known by its acronym, BOFOFIM, is sure to be a popular entry into the Folkmoot 2018 Festival line-up.

Venezuela

The rich tradition of Venezuelan folkloric dance and music will come alive at Folkmoot 2018 with Viva Venezuela by Sentir Venezolanofeaturing renowned choreographer Judith Perez and a diverse Afro-Latino ensemble cast!

As with most of our neighbors to the south, Spanish is the dominant language and many Americans are familiar with, “hola,” as the way to say, “hello.” That greeting is often followed by, “”¿Cómo está usted?” – “how are you?” – or the more familiar, “¿Cómo estás?,” with friends and relatives.

Cherokee

The Warriors of AniKituhwa, the traditional dance troupe of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, are always a popular feature of any Folkmoot Festival. And even though they are the only true native people of our beloved Smoky Mountians, our Cherokee neighbors have a language other than English, too.

Say, hello: ᎣᏏᏲ (Osiyo) [Oh-see-YOH]

Osiyo is the traditional Cherokee greeting. A smile and a wave is all that you need with Osiyo!

Appalachian

Appalachia might be part of the United States where English is the majority language, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t other was to say, “hello,” than simply, “hello.” Folks might say, “How are you?,” or, “How’s it going?,” as a greeting. You’ll also hear, “Hey!,” and occasionally, “Howdy!”  

And, of course, “hey, y’all!”

No matter how we say it – any greeting at Folkmoot may very easily begin a whole new friendship!

 

Folkmoot 2018 is one month away!

Folkmoot 2018 is one month away!

Folkmoot 2018 is one month away!

Western North Carolina’s biggest party of the summer will begin July 19 and run through July 29 and will bring from around the world to the Smoky Mountains a celebration of culture and dance and beauty and pageantry and a shared peace and mutual understanding among us all!

Now in it’s 35th edition, the 2018 Folkmoot Festival will feature performing dance troupes from Ghana, Italy, Czech Republic, Mexico, Thailland and Northern Cyprus and Venezuela as well as Anglo Appalachian and, as always, Cherokee dancers and musicians. 

Ticket packages and tickets for individual performances are available here.

Folkmoot is defined as a “meeting of the people” and delivers exuberant, educational and entertaining programs for all ages based on cultural exchange through dance and music.  The festival is designed to build global relationships, foster cultural understanding and develop community prosperity. 

Over 8,000 performers from approximately 150 countries have visited the mountains of Western North Carolina over the three and a half decades of the Folkmoot Festival and the 2018 festival promises to be better than ever.  

What’s New for the 2018 Festival

Folkmoot 2018 will be spectacular! Gala under the Stars, July 19 – 7:00 p.m., Annual Fundraiser for Friends of Folkmoot, $175 per couple. The Gala is the kickoff event for the festival and a fundraiser for Friends of Folkmoot, sponsors and their guests. Held in Waynesville in the field adjacent to the Friendship Center, Friends of Folkmoot members will enjoy specialty foods and beverages while cultural performers take the stage under the stars for their first appearance of the festival. 

Camp Folkmoot – Hands around the Globe, July 20 – 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., $30. Dancers of all abilities ages 10 – 17 years who are inspired by dance and live music can learn international folk dance moves with cultural ambassadors in Waynesville to perform at the Folkmoot Festival. Learn basic concepts and movements, gain an appreciation of the similarities and differences between cultures and hear the timeless, captivating stories behind the dances of each international group. The day includes “make-and-take” cultural crafts and culminates in a short performance with the groups and community participants. Families and youth groups are encouraged to register. Snacks, lunch, and drinks will be provided. Tickets for this event are $30 per camper and will include lunch, snacks and supplies. Discounts are available to groups of four or more if pre-registered together. For more information, contact Elizabeth Burson, 828-452-2997.

Many Cultures Day, July 21, 2017 – 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., $5 admission. This outdoor event is in its third year, scheduled for immediately after the Parade of Nations in downtown Waynesville. The event features live art demonstrations, 30-vendors, youth activities hosted by community groups, ethnic food trucks, international performers, community dance lessons, a youth performance stage with local youth fiddlers and dancers; additionally, there will be two Cherokee stickball game demonstrations. The cost of this outdoor festival is $5 for individuals over 5 years old.

Sunday Soirée , July 22 – 7:00 p.m. Celebrating our second year of the Sunday Soiree, the community is invited to experience the foods of eight world cultures, presented by the chefs of the Blind Pig Supper Club with entertainment provided by regional youth celebrating cultural arts. Performers will represent Appalachian, African, American Jazz and Cherokee cultures and then meet and greet Folkmoot’s international performers over dessert!

2018 Festival Event Schedule

Our schedule is subject to change. Please check the festival schedule page here on our site for additions or cancellations or call the ticket office, 828-452-2997.  All tickets are subject to NC sales tax and an online service fee. The number of performance groups is included for each venue.

Folkmoot 2018 will be spectacular! 

July 19: Gala on the Green – An opening party & performance for Friends of Folkmoot.

July 20: Camp Folkmoot – For kids! Learn international folk dances from our visiting performers!

July 20: Grand Opening MatineeQueen Auditorium, Folkmoot Center. All groups will perform followed by cultural conversations with the audience and dance troupe members.

July 20: Grand Opening Extravaganza! In Lake Junaluska’s Stuart Auditorium, always one of the festival’s highlights!

July 21: Parade of Nations! A public event, beginning at 10 a.m., in which all visiting dance troupes (and many others) parade down Main Street, Waynesville, in one of the festival’s most colorful and joyous events. It’s free and open to the public. Y’all come!

July 21: Many Cultures Day! Come to our Folkmoot International Center immediately after the Parade of Nations. The event lasts until 4 p.m. and features 30-vendors, youth activities hosted by community groups, ethnic food trucks, international performers, community dance lessons, and a youth performance stage with local youth fiddlers and dancers. There also will be two Cherokee stickball game demonstrations. The cost of this outdoor festival is $5 for individuals over 5 years old.

July 21: Haywood Community College. A full performance by all visiting dance troupes. One of the most popular performances of the festival each year.

July 22: Hickory, North Carolina. Two performances, 2 p.m. & 5 p.m. Hosted by the Hickory International Council in the Drendel Auditorium (4 groups) *includes post-performance Cultural Conversations. Tickets will be available through the International Council & Drendel Auditorium when they are made available. 

July 22: Sunday Soirée, Waynesville, Folkmoot Greenspace, Folkmoot Center. An international friendship dinner, beginning at 5 p.m., featuring food from the Blind Pig Supper Club and conversations, entertainment by Western North Carolina youth cultural groups. 

Folkmoot 2018 will be spectacular! July 23: a free day for our performers. You might run into them anywhere exploring our beautiful Smoky Mountains!

July 24: Cherokee Ambassador’s Day, 3 p.m., Cherokee Central High School, Cherokee, North Carolina. The cost is $20 for adults, $5 for kids and it’s an extraordinary opportunity for our visiting performers to engage with and learn more about our region’s treasured Native American culture & history. 

July 24: Canton, North Carolina. A 7 p.m. performance in the historic Colonial Theater followed by an after-party at Bearwaters Brewery.

July 25: Hendersonville, North Carolina. A 2 p.m. matinee performance at Blue Ridge Community College will feature all performing troupes.

July 25: Waynesville, North Carolina – Tranquility Farm Fundraiser, 6 p.m. (call 828.452.2997 for details, tickets.)

July 25: Maggie Valley Welcome Wagon, Maggie Valley, North CarolinaElevated Mountain Distilling Company. 7 p.m. A very special and intimate performance by three to four of our visiting dance troupes.

July 26: Folkmoot Center. 12 p.m. – 3 p.m. – Hazelwood Neighborhood Hospitality. Meet & Greet with Performers. 

July 26: Franklin, North Carolina. A 7 p.m. performance at the Smoky Mountain Performing Arts Center (All groups). 

July 27: Asheville, North Carolina. A 2 p.m. matinee in the Diana Wortham Theatre. A 7 p.m. performance in the Diana Wortham Theatre.

July 28: International Festival Day – Downtown Waynesville, North Carolina. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Another free and public event, a wonderful day of celebrating international friendships and cultural exchange!

July 28: Performance of all groups at Haywood Community College, 7 p.m.

July 29: Candlelight Closing, Stuart Auditorium, Lake Junaluska, North Carolina. A rich, colorful & emotional last festival performance filled with tradition, joys and even a few tears!

Be a Folkmoot “insider”

Show your love of international culture and the legacy of Folkmoot and dress in your best cultural regalia for Folkmoot performances! The public is encouraged to join the fun by sharing their own cultural heritage at all Folkmoot events. As an example, individuals with Scottish heritage are invited to wear their kilt to any Folkmoot performances. Cultural exchange and celebration are at the heart of Folkmoot.  Dress to impress and Folkmoot will feature a photo of you on our Instagram and Facebook pages!

Be a Folkmoot supporter

Folkmoot is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization that relies on donations, sponsorships, grants, ticket sales, and Friends of Folkmoot members to produce the Folkmoot Festival each year. Everyone can celebrate and support Folkmoot programs by becoming a member through the Friends of Folkmoot by clicking here. Donations support community-building events for kids and families and support our international guests during their stay in Waynesville at the Historic Hazelwood School

Be a Folkmoot festival volunteer

Volunteers are still needed to prepare for our visitors and for support during the festival. If you, your company, church or civic group would like to help, please contact Catherine MacCallum at 828-452-2997, or fill out our online form