Images of Folkmoot 2018 – Intrepid Media

Images of Folkmoot 2018 - Intrepid Media

Oh, most certainly, we have many of those stunning images of Folkmoot 2018!

Folkmoot is a veritable feast for photographers, videographers, artists of all kinds who love to capture colorful, compelling, engaging images and share them with the world.

And each Folkmoot Festival produces so many beautiful images it’s actually very difficult to try to corral them all into a central place where everyone can enjoy them. But we’re going to try.

We have been steadily adding images from Folkmoot 2018 to our  Videos & Images Page, here on our website. Folkmoot 2018 ended July 29 and nearly a week later we continue the task of collecting thousands of photos and videos taken during the 10-day festival.

In addition to those appearing on our Video & Images page, we also have links to larger collections by some of the areas best photographers and videographers.

We’ll also feature some of those images here in a series of pieces we will publish, featuring the work of individual contributors.

Images of Folkmoot 2018 - Intrepid MediaToday’s post features the work of the Intrepid Media Group, who photographed Folkmoot’s show in Hickory and our Candlelight Closing performance at Lake Junaluska.

Intrepid Media can be found on Facebook and the young group’s Folkmoot photos from Hickory are contained in a Dropbox Folder here and the photos from Candlelight Closing can be found in a Dropbox Folder here.

Our first installment in this series featured long-time Folkmoot photographer, volunteer and all-around-good-guy Patrick Parton.

Our second installment this series featured the work of a young, bright and talented home-grown photographic talent, Stephen Wenzel.

Our third piece in the series featured our own videos as they were shot and uploaded to our Folkmoot YouTube channel.

Our fourth piece in the series featured the work of our new Folkmoot friends, Ezekiel and Sheila Coppersmith.

Folkmoot Vision

Our vision is to repurpose the historic Hazelwood School, the “Folkmoot Friendship Center” into a multi-stakeholder, year-round resource for arts and cultural engagement, educational enrichment, creative entrepreneurship and community development. We envision a community that welcomes diversity, celebrates multiculturalism, embraces creativity and participates wholeheartedly in the activities that connect us.

Images of Folkmoot 2018 - Intrepid MediaBirth of Folkmoot: an Old English word meaning “meeting of the people”

In 1973, Dr. Clinton Border, a Waynesville surgeon, accompanied a local square dance team to a folk festival in Sidmouth, England. There began the dream that would, 11 years later, become Folkmoot USA.

Border was convinced that Western North Carolina, which was already steeped in tradition and dedicated to the preservation of its own heritage, was the perfect location for an international folk festival in the United States. During the next few years, Border traveled to other festivals in Poland and France and began gathering information and developing contacts. He also started contacting local government and community leaders back home.

By 1983, Border was ready to present his vision to Haywood County’s community leaders. Despite language barriers and the inherent scheduling difficulties involved in getting foreign performers from their homes to Haywood County, Border believed something invaluable occurs when cultures so rich in tradition come together to share their lives.

One month after Border’s presentation to community leaders, a board of directors met to launch Folkmoot USA, the North Carolina International Folk Festival.

Folkmoot Facts

  • Folkmoot USA is a non-profit 501(c)[3] organization that relies upon donations, sponsorships, memberships and grants to provide year-round programming at the Folkmoot Friendship Center and to produce Folkmoot USA, an annual 2-week celebration of global culture.
  • In 2003, with Senate Bill 840, the North Carolina General Assembly declared the Folkmoot Festival, the International Festival of North Carolina.
  • Folkmoot USA is held annually during the last two weeks of July and brings international folk dancers and musicians from around the world to perform throughout Western North Carolina.
  • Approximately 100,000 people attend Folkmoot performances each year.
  • Based on a study by Syneva Economics, the Folkmoot Festival attendees create a 9.2 million dollar economic impact in Western North Carolina.  This economic activity support 110.7 jobs of Western North Carolina residents and generates 1.27 million dollar in tax revenue related to consumer-driven commerce.
  • Folkmoot USA is a member of CIOFF – International Council of Organization of Folklore Festivals and Folk Art, in partnership with UNESCO. There are approximately 9-member countries who meet each year at the World Congress.
  • In 2014, Folkmoot was named a Top Ten Festival by USA Today. For 22 years, the Southeast Tourism Society named the Festival, “One of the Top 20 Events in the Southeast” and the Southeast Tourism Society names Folkmoot as a “Top 100 Event in America”.
  • Each year, hundreds of groups apply to perform, but only 8 to 10 are chosen. Each year, Folkmoot invites new and different performers.

Images of Folkmoot 2018 – Ezekiel Coppersmith

Images of Folkmoot 2018 - Ezekiel Coppersmith

Oh, to be sure, we have many of those stunning images of Folkmoot 2018!

Folkmoot is a veritable feast for photographers, videographers, artists of all kinds who love to capture colorful, compelling, engaging images and share them with the world.

And each Folkmoot Festival produces so many beautiful images it’s actually very difficult to try to corral them all into a central place where everyone can enjoy them. But we’re going to try.

We have been steadily adding images from Folkmoot 2018 to our  Videos & Images Page, here on our website. Folkmoot 2018 ended July 29 and nearly a week later we continue the task of collecting thousands of photos and videos taken during the 10-day festival.

In addition to those appearing on our Video & Images page, we also have links to larger collections by some of the areas best photographers and videographers.

We’ll also feature some of those images here in a series of pieces we will publish, featuring the work of individual contributors.

Images of Folkmoot 2018 - Ezekiel Coppersmith

Today’s post features the work of our new Folkmoot friends, Ezekiel and Sheila Coppersmith.

Please visit the Google Drive file containing Ezekiel’s Folkmoot 2018 photos, scroll through them to find your favorites!

Ezekiel is a horticulturalist by day and in his free time a self taught hobbiest photographer. Pretty good work, we think for a “hobbiest.”

“I have a real passion for wildlife and nature photography but have built a passion for photographing events recently,” he said. “Most of my work can be found on my social media. ”

And, in fact, you can find Ezekiel’s work on his Facebook page, his Instagram, his Twitter account, his GooglePlus presence and others around the web.

 

Our first installment in this series featured long-time Folkmoot photographer, volunteer and all-around-good-guy Patrick Parton.

Our second installment this series featured the work of a young, bright and talented home-grown photographic talent, Stephen Wenzel.

Our third piece in the series featured our own videos as they were shot and uploaded to our Folkmoot YouTube channel.

Future installments of this series will feature the work of others, including images from the Intrepid Media Group as well and some of the nearly 600 photos and video captures by our own Folkmoot staff.

Folkmoot Vision

Our vision is to repurpose the historic Hazelwood School, the “Folkmoot Friendship Center” into a multi-stakeholder, year-round resource for arts and cultural engagement, educational enrichment, creative entrepreneurship and community development. We envision a community that welcomes diversity, celebrates multiculturalism, embraces creativity and participates wholeheartedly in the activities that connect us.

Images of Folkmoot 2018 - Ezekiel CoppersmithBirth of Folkmoot: an Old English word meaning “meeting of the people”

In 1973, Dr. Clinton Border, a Waynesville surgeon, accompanied a local square dance team to a folk festival in Sidmouth, England. There began the dream that would, 11 years later, become Folkmoot USA.

Border was convinced that Western North Carolina, which was already steeped in tradition and dedicated to the preservation of its own heritage, was the perfect location for an international folk festival in the United States. During the next few years, Border traveled to other festivals in Poland and France and began gathering information and developing contacts. He also started contacting local government and community leaders back home.

By 1983, Border was ready to present his vision to Haywood County’s community leaders. Despite language barriers and the inherent scheduling difficulties involved in getting foreign performers from their homes to Haywood County, Border believed something invaluable occurs when cultures so rich in tradition come together to share their lives.

One month after Border’s presentation to community leaders, a board of directors met to launch Folkmoot USA, the North Carolina International Folk Festival.

Folkmoot Facts

  • Folkmoot USA is a non-profit 501(c)[3] organization that relies upon donations, sponsorships, memberships and grants to provide year-round programming at the Folkmoot Friendship Center and to produce Folkmoot USA, an annual 2-week celebration of global culture.
  • In 2003, with Senate Bill 840, the North Carolina General Assembly declared the Folkmoot Festival, the International Festival of North Carolina.
  • Folkmoot USA is held annually during the last two weeks of July and brings international folk dancers and musicians from around the world to perform throughout Western North Carolina.
  • Approximately 100,000 people attend Folkmoot performances each year.
  • Based on a study by Syneva Economics, the Folkmoot Festival attendees create a 9.2 million dollar economic impact in Western North Carolina.  This economic activity support 110.7 jobs of Western North Carolina residents and generates 1.27 million dollar in tax revenue related to consumer-driven commerce.
  • Folkmoot USA is a member of CIOFF – International Council of Organization of Folklore Festivals and Folk Art, in partnership with UNESCO. There are approximately 9-member countries who meet each year at the World Congress.
  • In 2014, Folkmoot was named a Top Ten Festival by USA Today. For 22 years, the Southeast Tourism Society named the Festival, “One of the Top 20 Events in the Southeast” and the Southeast Tourism Society names Folkmoot as a “Top 100 Event in America”.
  • Each year, hundreds of groups apply to perform, but only 8 to 10 are chosen. Each year, Folkmoot invites new and different performers.

Videos of Folkmoot 2018!

Videos of Folkmoot 2018!

We have compiled as your online souvenir videos of Folkmoot 2018!

Oh, yes, all those stunning images of Folkmoot 2018!

Folkmoot is a veritable feast for photographers, videographers, artists of all kinds who love to capture colorful, compelling, engaging images and share them with the world.

And each Folkmoot Festival produces so many beautiful images it’s actually very difficult to try to corral them all into a central place where everyone can enjoy them. But we’re going to try.

We have been steadily adding images from Folkmoot 2018 to our  Videos & Images Page, here on our website. Folkmoot 2018 ended July 29 and nearly a week later we continue the task of collecting thousands of photos and videos taken during the 10-day festival.

In addition to those appearing on our Video & Images page, we also have links to larger collections by some of the areas best photographers and videographers.

We’ll also feature some of those images here in a series of pieces we will publish, featuring the work of individual contributors.

This – the third piece in the series – features our own videos as they were shot and uploaded to our Folkmoot YouTube channel.

Most of the videos posted there remain unedited. They are unscripted, shot in real time and provide a natural sense of each performance and event. (Edited is progressing but it takes a while).

We though you might enjoy them in their natural state.

Our second installment this series featured the work of a young, bright and talented home-grown photographic talent, Stephen Wenzel.

Our first installment in this series featured long-time Folkmoot photographer, volunteer and all-around-good-guy Patrick Parton.

Future installments of this series will feature the work of others, including new Folkmoot friend Ezekial  & Sheila Coppersmith, images from the Intrepid Media Group as well and some of the nearly 600 photos and video captures by our own Folkmoot staff.

Folkmoot Vision

Our vision is to repurpose the historic Hazelwood School, the “Folkmoot Friendship Center” into a multi-stakeholder, year-round resource for arts and cultural engagement, educational enrichment, creative entrepreneurship and community development. We envision a community that welcomes diversity, celebrates multiculturalism, embraces creativity and participates wholeheartedly in the activities that connect us.

Birth of Folkmoot: an Old English word meaning “meeting of the people”

In 1973, Dr. Clinton Border, a Waynesville surgeon, accompanied a local square dance team to a folk festival in Sidmouth, England. There began the dream that would, 11 years later, become Folkmoot USA.

Border was convinced that Western North Carolina, which was already steeped in tradition and dedicated to the preservation of its own heritage, was the perfect location for an international folk festival in the United States. During the next few years, Border traveled to other festivals in Poland and France and began gathering information and developing contacts. He also started contacting local government and community leaders back home.

By 1983, Border was ready to present his vision to Haywood County’s community leaders. Despite language barriers and the inherent scheduling difficulties involved in getting foreign performers from their homes to Haywood County, Border believed something invaluable occurs when cultures so rich in tradition come together to share their lives.

One month after Border’s presentation to community leaders, a board of directors met to launch Folkmoot USA, the North Carolina International Folk Festival.

Folkmoot Facts

  • Folkmoot USA is a non-profit 501(c)[3] organization that relies upon donations, sponsorships, memberships and grants to provide year-round programming at the Folkmoot Friendship Center and to produce Folkmoot USA, an annual 2-week celebration of global culture.
  • In 2003, with Senate Bill 840, the North Carolina General Assembly declared the Folkmoot Festival, the International Festival of North Carolina.
  • Folkmoot USA is held annually during the last two weeks of July and brings international folk dancers and musicians from around the world to perform throughout Western North Carolina.
  • Approximately 100,000 people attend Folkmoot performances each year.
  • Based on a study by Syneva Economics, the Folkmoot Festival attendees create a 9.2 million dollar economic impact in Western North Carolina.  This economic activity support 110.7 jobs of Western North Carolina residents and generates 1.27 million dollar in tax revenue related to consumer-driven commerce.
  • Folkmoot USA is a member of CIOFF – International Council of Organization of Folklore Festivals and Folk Art, in partnership with UNESCO. There are approximately 9-member countries who meet each year at the World Congress.
  • In 2014, Folkmoot was named a Top Ten Festival by USA Today. For 22 years, the Southeast Tourism Society named the Festival, “One of the Top 20 Events in the Southeast” and the Southeast Tourism Society names Folkmoot as a “Top 100 Event in America”.
  • Each year, hundreds of groups apply to perform, but only 8 to 10 are chosen. Each year, Folkmoot invites new and different performers.

Images of Folkmoot 2018 – Stephen Wenzel

Images of Folkmoot 2018 - Stephen Wenzel

Oh, yes, all those stunning images of Folkmoot 2018!

Folkmoot is a veritable feast for photographers, videographers, artists of all kinds who love to capture colorful, compelling, engaging images and share them with the world.

And each Folkmoot Festival produces so many beautiful images it’s actually very difficult to try to corral them all into a central place where everyone can enjoy them. But we’re going to try.

We have been steadily adding images from Folkmoot 2018 to our  Videos & Images Page, here on our website. Folkmoot 2018 ended July 29 and nearly a week later we continue the task of collecting thousands of photos and videos taken during the 10-day festival.

In addition to those appearing on our Video & Images page, we also have links to larger collections by some of the areas best photographers and videographers.

We’ll also feature some of those images here in a series of pieces we will publish, featuring the work of individual contributors.

Images of Folkmoot 2018 - Stephen WenzelThis – the second piece in the series – features the work of a young, bright and talented home-grown photographic talent, Stephen Wenzel.

We have space here to publish only three of Stephen’s outstanding photos. Please visit his special Folkmoot web page, at his photography site, to see all his Folkmoot 2018 images.

Our first installment in this series featured long-time Folkmoot photographer, volunteer and all-around-good-guy Patrick Parton.

Future installments of this series will feature the work of others, including new Folkmoot friend Ezekial Coppersmith, images from the Intrepid Media Group as well and some of the nearly 600 photos and video captures by our own Folkmoot staff.

Stephen Wenzel displays a talent for photographer well above his teen years. A 2018 graduate of Tuscola High School who is headed for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Stephen literally grew up in Folkmoot.

His parents met at Folkmoot over two decades ago when his mother, Georgiana, was a visiting dancer with her troupe from Romania and his father, Chris, was a Folkmoot Guide. Georgiana and Chris found love in Folkmoot, married and have been volunteers ever since, combining their passion for family with their passion for Folkmoot.

Stephen intends to study biology at UNC but, seriously, with his talent for photography the arts can’t be far behind!

Images of Folkmoot 2018 - Stephen WenzelFolkmoot Vision

Our vision is to repurpose the historic Hazelwood School, the “Folkmoot Friendship Center” into a multi-stakeholder, year-round resource for arts and cultural engagement, educational enrichment, creative entrepreneurship and community development. We envision a community that welcomes diversity, celebrates multiculturalism, embraces creativity and participates wholeheartedly in the activities that connect us.

Birth of Folkmoot: an Old English word meaning “meeting of the people”

In 1973, Dr. Clinton Border, a Waynesville surgeon, accompanied a local square dance team to a folk festival in Sidmouth, England. There began the dream that would, 11 years later, become Folkmoot USA.

Border was convinced that Western North Carolina, which was already steeped in tradition and dedicated to the preservation of its own heritage, was the perfect location for an international folk festival in the United States. During the next few years, Border traveled to other festivals in Poland and France and began gathering information and developing contacts. He also started contacting local government and community leaders back home.

By 1983, Border was ready to present his vision to Haywood County’s community leaders. Despite language barriers and the inherent scheduling difficulties involved in getting foreign performers from their homes to Haywood County, Border believed something invaluable occurs when cultures so rich in tradition come together to share their lives.

One month after Border’s presentation to community leaders, a board of directors met to launch Folkmoot USA, the North Carolina International Folk Festival.

Folkmoot Facts

  • Folkmoot USA is a non-profit 501(c)[3] organization that relies upon donations, sponsorships, memberships and grants to provide year-round programming at the Folkmoot Friendship Center and to produce Folkmoot USA, an annual 2-week celebration of global culture.
  • In 2003, with Senate Bill 840, the North Carolina General Assembly declared the Folkmoot Festival, the International Festival of North Carolina.
  • Folkmoot USA is held annually during the last two weeks of July and brings international folk dancers and musicians from around the world to perform throughout Western North Carolina.
  • Approximately 100,000 people attend Folkmoot performances each year.
  • Based on a study by Syneva Economics, the Folkmoot Festival attendees create a 9.2 million dollar economic impact in Western North Carolina.  This economic activity support 110.7 jobs of Western North Carolina residents and generates 1.27 million dollar in tax revenue related to consumer-driven commerce.
  • Folkmoot USA is a member of CIOFF – International Council of Organization of Folklore Festivals and Folk Art, in partnership with UNESCO. There are approximately 9-member countries who meet each year at the World Congress.
  • In 2014, Folkmoot was named a Top Ten Festival by USA Today. For 22 years, the Southeast Tourism Society named the Festival, “One of the Top 20 Events in the Southeast” and the Southeast Tourism Society names Folkmoot as a “Top 100 Event in America”.
  • Each year, hundreds of groups apply to perform, but only 8 to 10 are chosen. Each year, Folkmoot invites new and different performers.

Images of Folkmoot 2018 – Patrick Parton

Images of Folkmoot 2018 - Patrick Parton

Oh, yes, all those stunning images of Folkmoot 2018!

Folkmoot is a veritable feast for photographers, videographers, artists of all kinds who love to capture colorful, compelling, engaging images and share them with the world.

And each Folkmoot Festival produces so many beautiful images it’s actually very difficult to try to corral them all into a central place where everyone can enjoy them. But we’re going to try.

We have been steadily adding images from Folkmoot 2018 to our  Videos & Images Page, here on our website. Folkmoot 2018 ended July 29 and nearly a week later we continue the task of collecting thousands of photos and videos taken during the 10-day festival.

In addition to those appearing on our Video & Images page, we also have links to larger collections by some of the areas best photographers and videographers.

We’ll also feature some of those images here in a series of pieces we will publish, featuring the work of individual contributors.

Images of Folkmoot 2018 - Patrick PartonThis – the first piece in the series – features the work of long-time Folkmoot photographer, volunteer and all-around-good-guy Patrick Parton.

Future installments of this series will feature the work of the young but artistically mature photographer Stephen Wenzel and new Folkmoot friend Ezekial Coppersmith, images from the Intrepid Media Group as well and some of the nearly 600 photos and video captures by our own Folkmoot staff.

Patrick Parton has long been considered one of our region’s top amateur photographers. Truth be told (and seen), he’s professional quality.

Patrick is continuing to compile all this Folkmoot 2018 photos but you can see a wonderful selection here in an album on Facebook.

See Patrick’s photos from Folkmoot Festival of the past at his photography website.

A Waynesville native and graduate of Tuscola High School, Patrick has worked at his “real job” for over 31 years while continuing to pursue photographer for the love the the art.

After volunteering with Folkmoot in the early 1990’s with his family and attending various Folkmoot shows and events, Patrick decided to get serious about work as a Folkmoot photographer.

Images of Folkmoot 2018 - Patrick PartonBack then, digital cameras were beginning to hit the market and Patrick found it exciting to apply digital settings and filtering to his hobby.

Not only did he regularly photograph his family, but he began bringing his digital camera to Folkmoot events.

He was so pleased with how many of the photos turned out that he showed them to former Folkmoot Board President, Linda Manes. She enjoyed them so much that she asked Patrick to come to all of the events and take pictures. Not only did he say, “yes,” but he took all of the pictures as a volunteer. Even today, Patrick continues to take pictures for Folkmoot at absolutely no cost as a contribution to the community.

Patrick’s favorite part of the festival is the Gala because it’s the first time all of the groups meet and perform together. He enjoys this, he says, because he really appreciates all of the different cultures and dancers showing up right here at home in Western North Carolina.

Volunteering with Folkmoot has enabled Patrick to make friends across the globe, enjoy cultural diversity, see firsthand that we are all much more alike than different, and share with the Folkmoot community his beautiful photos!

Folkmoot Vision

Our vision is to repurpose the historic Hazelwood School, the “Folkmoot Friendship Center” into a multi-stakeholder, year-round resource for arts and cultural engagement, educational enrichment, creative entrepreneurship and community development. We envision a community that welcomes diversity, celebrates multiculturalism, embraces creativity and participates wholeheartedly in the activities that connect us.

Birth of Folkmoot: an Old English word meaning “meeting of the people”

In 1973, Dr. Clinton Border, a Waynesville surgeon, accompanied a local square dance team to a folk festival in Sidmouth, England. There began the dream that would, 11 years later, become Folkmoot USA.

Border was convinced that Western North Carolina, which was already steeped in tradition and dedicated to the preservation of its own heritage, was the perfect location for an international folk festival in the United States. During the next few years, Border traveled to other festivals in Poland and France and began gathering information and developing contacts. He also started contacting local government and community leaders back home.

By 1983, Border was ready to present his vision to Haywood County’s community leaders. Despite language barriers and the inherent scheduling difficulties involved in getting foreign performers from their homes to Haywood County, Border believed something invaluable occurs when cultures so rich in tradition come together to share their lives.

One month after Border’s presentation to community leaders, a board of directors met to launch Folkmoot USA, the North Carolina International Folk Festival.

Folkmoot Facts

  • Folkmoot USA is a non-profit 501(c)[3] organization that relies upon donations, sponsorships, memberships and grants to provide year-round programming at the Folkmoot Friendship Center and to produce Folkmoot USA, an annual 2-week celebration of global culture.
  • In 2003, with Senate Bill 840, the North Carolina General Assembly declared the Folkmoot Festival, the International Festival of North Carolina.
  • Folkmoot USA is held annually during the last two weeks of July and brings international folk dancers and musicians from around the world to perform throughout Western North Carolina.
  • Approximately 100,000 people attend Folkmoot performances each year.
  • Based on a study by Syneva Economics, the Folkmoot Festival attendees create a 9.2 million dollar economic impact in Western North Carolina.  This economic activity support 110.7 jobs of Western North Carolina residents and generates 1.27 million dollar in tax revenue related to consumer-driven commerce.
  • Folkmoot USA is a member of CIOFF – International Council of Organization of Folklore Festivals and Folk Art, in partnership with UNESCO. There are approximately 9-member countries who meet each year at the World Congress.
  • In 2014, Folkmoot was named a Top Ten Festival by USA Today. For 22 years, the Southeast Tourism Society named the Festival, “One of the Top 20 Events in the Southeast” and the Southeast Tourism Society names Folkmoot as a “Top 100 Event in America”.
  • Each year, hundreds of groups apply to perform, but only 8 to 10 are chosen. Each year, Folkmoot invites new and different performers.

Thank you for a magnificent Folkmoot 2018!

It's a concert hall, a commercial kitchen and cafeteria, a dormitory, an event space - it's the Folkmoot Center.

Thank you for a magnificent Folkmoot 2018!

The music and dancing have faded (for now, briefly), lasting friendships and bonds have been rendered to sweet memories, the banners are down, the flags fly in our collective consciousness and, maybe, our world feels a bit more peaceful.

At least, that’s what we hope each year we draw the world to Main Street Waynesville and spread our joy across Western North Carolina: that through dance and music and cultural sharing we might nudge us all toward our better angels and come to understand we are, as people, more alike than we are different.

Yes, Folkmoot 2018 was spectacular and we’re grateful for everyone who help make it so beautiful.

Angeline Schwab, Folkmoot Executive Director, sums it up in her personal thanks:

“You may not know that Folkmoot grows from a 5 person, mostly part-time, staff to over 74 workers over the month of July. We have cafeteria workers, maintenance people, guides and assistant guides, social media people and bus drivers. We also have 400 volunteers, emcees, board members, ushers, office workers…you name it. We are a volunteer-based organization.

“Managing communication between themselves, their groups and the rest of us is the primary challenge. It’s also being conscious of cultural sensitivities, having an understanding of world politics, self-control, knowledge of Folkmoot sign language; also learning when to be a leader and when to follow. How to manage an emergency situation, being on time, sweeping a stage, phone etiquette, ticketing software…I could keep going.

“This group of workers are primarily local kids – students from Haywood County schools led by a group of caring adults who wanted to have an international experience right here at home. Our students from Tuscola and Pisgah High Schools along with students from Western Carolina University, Lenoir Rhyne, NC State University, Indiana, Tennessee and South Carolina colleges.

“We are having a great festival together. As Director, I’ve felt happier and more relieved and relaxed than I ever have while working with this powerful team. We were like murmurating starlings, a world-class marching band, a Haywood County power-team and a Folkmoot family.

“In the heartfelt words of assistant guide, Gracie Feichter, “These are happy and grateful tears I’m crying because I can’t picture my life without Folkmoot.

“These lovely groups, these guides and this awesome festival team, along with you…the friends of Folkmoot are the ones who’ve made this beautiful experience possible…us.

“Please take a bow, ya’ll!”

Be sure to visit our  Videos & Images Page, here on our website. Folkmoot 2018 ended July 29 and nearly a week later we continue the task of collecting thousands of photos and videos taken during the 10-day festival.

In addition to those appearing on our Video & Images page, we also have links to larger collections by some of the areas best photographers and videographers. Our Instagram is a pretty active place, too!

Here are some of our beautiful highlights from Folkmoot 2018 (among many, many highlights)!!

Folkmoot Photos

Folkmoot Photos

Photo Images of Folkmoot!

Folkmoot 2016 - Blue Ridge Community College

The beauty, the pageantry, the drama and exquisite grace of movement

caught in the photo images of Folkmoot!

 

Images & videos from Folkmoot Summer 2015

Create a Folkmoot legacy all your own!

We continue to compile more images & videos from Folkmoot Summer 2015! As anyone could guess, Folkmoot is a veritable paradise of bright images and videos, dance and movement, energetic people with broad smiles and engaging personalities. Here, below, are some samples from that trio for the 2015 Summer Festival. Further on down, we’ll post … Read moreImages & videos from Folkmoot Summer 2015

Folkmoot Summer 2015 images remain forever!

Folkmoot Summer 2015 images remain forever!

The Folkmoot Summer Festival of 2015 closed its 10-day run July 26 but Folkmoot Summer 2015 images remain forever! In addition to being North Carolina’s Official Folklife Festival and the biggest party of each summer in Western Carolina, Folkmoot is, among many other aspects, a feast for the senses, a delicious full meal with dessert … Read moreFolkmoot Summer 2015 images remain forever!

The Campaign for Folkmoot – future is here!

Folkmoot Friendship Center

The Campaign for Folkmoot, which began quietly in 2015, is raising $1.2 million for Folkmoot Friendship Center as well as year-round programs and the ever-popular summer festival, Folkmoot USA! Think you know Folkmoot? You haven’t seen anything yet! With a campaign team lead by Joe Sam Queen, the effort is leading the way to a bright, new … Read moreThe Campaign for Folkmoot – future is here!